website

Spring Rollerskiing and Clinics

Spring Rollerskiing and Clinics - Gear West

We are excited to announce that we will again offer four roller ski clinics this spring for skiers of all levels. The two beginner clinics will focus on basic roller ski safety drills and are a good way to try out roller skiing for the first time. The two intermediate clinics will expand from the basics into more technique focused drills and exercises. The intermediate clinics are appropriate for skiers of all levels. See below for details.

If you are like me, the transition to spring happened weeks ago even with the cold and rainy weather we had. There was a ceremonious changing of the guard from my skis to my bikes, roller skis and running shoes. As soon as my skis were ground and waxed for the last time and tucked away in my basement, I checked over my roller skis. I retightened all the bolts, checked the wheels and fenders, and made sure the bindings were roadworthy. Shortly after I took my first trip out around my neighborhood. Some might think April is too early for that, but to me, it is always a good idea to transition from snow to the road as soon as possible. Roller skiing feels a little ‘different’ than snow skiing so the earlier the better to start thinking about how technique can carry over into the offseason and onto roller skis.

If you are interested in roller skiing for the first time, the equipment doesn’t have to be intimidating. Roller skis come as skate or classic skis. The skate skis have a thin wheel with a wide radius that allows a skier to go edge to edge with their technique. Classic skis have a ratchet in the rear (or front) wheel for the wheel to only spin in one direction for an efficient classic kick. Classic wheels are also low and wide compared to skate skis for stability. The most affordable skis are aluminum. More expensive skis are built similar to a ski shaft and allow for more flex and ski-like feel when skiing. Wheels come with different speeds and can often be changed to tailor the experience for skiers that like faster or slower ski speeds.

For safety equipment, a helmet is a must. Roller ski gloves are also a good idea to protect palms and fingers from the occasional stumble. These are available for purchase at Gear West and are better suited for summer weather than winter gloves. 

Some skiers will also use protective arm and knee pads. These can be found at most sporting goods stores. I find them to be overkill, but they sure can save some skin after a fall. I also consider sharp roller ski ferrules a piece of ‘safety equipment’. Ferrules replace winter snow baskets on poles and are made of a very hard carbide tip. They are much less likely to break than snow tips and will hold a sharp point much longer. Ferrules are a must and can be changed out easily using a heat gun and some pole glue. I consider them a must for safety because I have seen some nasty crashes at low speed by skiers whose tips slipped while poling. A small diamond file is also important to have to sharpen tips before skiing. These are portable and can be easily carried in a water pack or pocket.

Proper technique is also as much a safety factor as anything. Skiing with a forward position and with hips that are properly stacked and stable will allow roller skis to roll through small rocks and cracks on the trails and roads. I said this above, but some of the worst crashes I have seen happen at low speeds when roller skis stop dead on an unexpected pebble. Proper technique will help to push skis through these obstacles. When learning to roller ski, it makes sense to get some instruction for a few sessions to help transfer technique basics from snow to the road. As I said above, roller skiing can feel slightly ‘different’.

Roller skiing for me is as enjoyable as a standalone activity as snow skiing. I don’t slog through summer workouts just to get some winter training in – I do actually enjoy taking my ski skills to the roads and trails around my house. With the right equipment and a bit of technique instruction, any skier should feel this way. If this sounds fun, our clinics are a great place to start. There is a lot to discuss during these clinics, but there will also be plenty of time for drills and practice. 

At Gear West, we love Swenor roller skis, and we will have a full Swenor demo fleet available. Also, we will extend a 10 percent discount for those that would like to buy new skis or equipment before or after the clinic. All of the above-mentioned equipment is available for purchase with us. We will spend the necessary time with you to make sure you are outfitted properly. To register for the clinics, check out our clinic registration page.

https://www.gearwest.com/pages/rollerski-clinic

Clinic Schedule:

May 16 5:30PM Beginner Classic Clinic 

The beginner classic clinic will focus on basics of roller ski maintenance, safety, and technique. Safety and technique drills will be introduced to provide basic skills to build on. 

May 30 5:30PM Beginner Skate Clinic 

The beginner skate clinic will focus on basics of roller ski maintenance, safety, and technique. Safety and technique drills will be introduced to provide basic skills to build on. 

June 13 5:30PM Intermediate Classic Clinic 

The intermediate clinics can accommodate a wide range of abilities and are for those skiers who are looking for ski technique drills and discussion. 

June 27 5:30PM Intermediate Skate Clinic 

The intermediate clinics can accommodate a wide range of abilities and are for those skiers who are looking for ski technique drills and discussion.

 

Gear West Videos

How to Stop on rollerskis